Workcation Part 2

Workcation Part 2: March 2017 Session

(If you’re wondering, I didn’t write up Part 1 so you didn’t miss anything.) Brian and I came up with our Workcation Idea while driving back from the Poconos one weekend: What if every 2 months, we booked a weekend someplace without Internet and cranked out a bunch of work? No (or at least, limited) Internet. No distractions. Just work for the weekend. Brian wanted to work on a screenplay. I wanted to work on my online business, ImMovingtoLA.com, and articles and scripts I’m writing for I WIll Teach and GrowthLab.   It seemed like an awesome idea so we
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A Million Moments of Serendipity

Couple weeks ago, I was researching charisma, the ability to build rapport, that sort of thing. It led me down the path of the Charismatic Man: the Bill Clinton’s, the Dale Carnegie’s, the Neil Strauss’s… All of which were extremely interesting. But not the right context for me. A familiar voice creeped into my ear as the deadline for this research approached, a voice rooted deep in the lizard brain, strong and powerful — but one of very limited vocabulary: Why did you take on this project? You’re not smart enough to figure it out.  You’re running out of time.
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The Use of Barriers

I wrote about the Use of Feedback to calibrate my work. Today I wanted to write about Barriers. I define a barrier as a tool or technique that prevents distraction. I remember in college, I had friends who complained about being unable to study. They said they couldn’t focus. They became web doctors and self-diagnosed themselves with ADD or dyslexia, not taking into account their study environment. Nothing about their environments were conducive to studying: it was a dorm room where either someone was playing a videogame, or the television was tuned into the latest rerun of NEXT TOP MODEL.
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Prioritizing So Hard It Hurts

“I’m prioritizing so hard it hurts.” I first heard BJ Fogg, a Stanford professor who studies and teacher persuasion, utter this expression a year ago. As I listened to his interview (again and again — check it out here) I tried wrapping my mind around that idea. I didn’t get it, until a recent Saturday afternoon (which I’ll get to it below). The circumstances in which prioritization can inflict pain and cause ache suddenly emerged into focus. The Progression of My Understanding First the easy part: awareness  at the macro level, all the things you want to accomplish with your
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What I’m Reading: 7/31/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: Wheeler Dixon’s DEATH OF THE MOGULS “Death of the Moguls is a detailed assessment of the last days of the “rulers of film.” Wheeler Winston Dixon examines the careers of such moguls as  Harry Cohn at Columbia, Louis B. Mayer at MGM, Jack L. Warner at Warner Brothers, Adolph Zukor at Paramount, and Herbert J. Yates at Republic in the dying days of their once-mighty empires.” I wanted to build on my fundamentals of Hollywood history, to wrap context around what I’m learning today. If
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The Use of Feedback

I wanted to write about Feedback, Barriers, Stakes, and Batching (though I covered some thoughts on batching in My Morning Routine). I put off exploring these ideas and concepts because: Covering all of them felt extremely daunting Tactically I hadn’t worked out a system to implement them Wasn’t sure if my ideas were completely fleshed out However, the only way I’ll eventually get through all three is by first exploring one. Thus… What is Feedback? Feedback is the process of soliciting criticism for our work, using focused time to filter and distill those criticisms, and meaningfully implementing changes to improve
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What You Listen To Can Change Your Life

Ninety percent of my car rides I spend listening to “self-development,” a convenient grouping for the countless interviews, TED talks, and commencement speeches on my iPod. These last three months, as I steadily increased the number of times I bicycled to work in lieu of trapping myself in a steel cage with wheels, I’ve missed out on hours of their words of encouragement. In their place, I’ve traded for the sounds of morning sprinklers on pathetic strips of grass adjacent to sidewalks and apartment complexes, the rumble of earth movers beneath the stretch of the 10 across from Palms Blvd,
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My Morning Routine

For the last few months, my creative output has been in a rut. I didn’t understand how or why. I don’t attribute it to “writer’s block.” (The idea of “writer’s block is stupid. Typing the words is cringe worthy.) The problem, I realized, was how I batched my work. My Old Morning Routine Wake at 6 a.m. By 6:30 a.m., I’d sit to write (having washed up and eaten first.) I’d squeeze in 60 minutes of work before getting ready for my bike commute to work. A quarter of that time I spent “ramping up” so actual production lasted 45
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Time To Get Back To This

Time to get back to this. Yes. I’m moving large chunks of the “Moving to Los Angeles” posts to another blog, one geared towards Los Angeles, the entertainment industry, and personal finance. More on that another time. Meanwhile, I’m making a shift that I’ve wanted to see for some time, to write about self-development: what I’m reading, watching, or listening to, in this vein. Self-dev has been a pretty constant influence in my life since college. It’s just not always easy to talk about. There’s this connotation of weakness or embarrassment when I mention self-dev: the image of a sad,
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