Chris

All articles by Chris

 

Learning the Language of Growth

  I just finished my second week at Reforge and if I had to sum up the week, it’s this: I’m learning a new language — and it’s hard. Reforge teaches growth professionals how to advance their skills in growth through online education, networking and mentorship. The students are 3 years into their career at companies like Facebook, Google, Dropbox, LinkedIn, etc. aka some damn smart people. And after 5 minutes of talking with them, I realize I don’t have the vocabulary (yet) to talk through the ideas and concepts I’ll eventually teach, things like growth models, churn, and viral
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2 Things About SF Tech Culture

  Last week I learned some interesting things about SF tech culture. For example: Investing in cryptocurrencies is a thing People invest hundreds, even thousands of dollars in “coffee set-ups” — home coffee brewing equipment to make their own personal perfect cup of coffee Everyone loves wearing Patagonia But the biggest mental shifts I’ve had to make is about money. Here are 2 ideas about money I’m trying to hold simultaneously in my mind:
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Thank you, I Will Teach You to be Rich

  5 years ago, I was waiting tables at a Thai restaurant (thanks for the reminder, Facebook). To be honest, it was a low-point: I lost 20lbs on my diet of peanut butter sandwiches for lunch and wonton soup for dinner. I made $35 in tips during my shifts. Everything in my life felt like… you remember that B-movie with Matthew Mcconaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker, Failure to Launch? Basically, that. In an act of desperation and tapping into my savings, I bought an online course from this blogger named Ramit Sethi. It was called Find Your Dream Job, and
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Eating at Din Tai Fung

Before going to Taiwan, my friend prepared a document of recommendations. She wrote: “Soup Dumplings: Din Tai Fung is big in Taiwan, but I say it’s overrated. A soup dumpling is a soup dumpling, and we get great ones stateside.” We went to Din Tai Fung, and I couldn’t disagree more. The hype is well-deserved. This was probably my favorite meal (out of many good meals) in Taiwan. Of course, it wasn’t just about the soup dumplings — which were good. Here are some other things I loved about our meal at Din Tai Fung.
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Here’s Why I Clicked on Wilco de Kreij’s Facebook Ad

The first time I visited Times Square in New York City, I spent the entire day enthralled by the city’s lights and 30 foot billboards. Today, it’s just another stop on the subway where I have to dodge tourists and selfie sticks to get where I’m going. This is exactly how I feel about the wave of online courses popping up on my Facebook and Instagram feed this past year. I’ve been playing in the online course sandbox for the last 3 years. 90% of the time, I scroll right past these ads — they’re basically invisible. So, when I
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Lessons from The Founder (aka “that McDonald’s movie”)

On the plane ride back from Taiwan, one of the movies I watched was The Founder (2016), the Ray Kroc and McDonald’s story. I highly recommend it. Here are random lessons I took away from the movie:
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How My 16-Year-Old Cousins Use Instagram

I have a ton of younger cousins and second-cousins (which is what happens when your mom is #7 of 7 children and your dad is #4 of 4). We were talking about how they used social media, and how completely different it was from how I (and my peers) use it. (Mary Choi takes an amazing in-depth look teen behavior on social media here.) Here are my notes on how they use social media: 1. “I don’t have Facebook.” She never got into it. And if she’s not into it, that tells me her friends probably aren’t on there either.
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“They make you adapt for them.”

I caught this absolutely beautiful bit of foreshadowing from Robin Black a few months back. There was something magical about it, but I couldn’t put my finger on it. So I saved the interview and kinda forgot about it. It wasn’t until recently I connected the dots when reading other old interviews. This first interview they recorded a day before Conor McGregor knocked out Jose Aldo in a record 13 seconds. Robin is talking about how certain fighters have learned to adapt to Jose Aldo’s leg kicks. Basically, you have to keep your weight off your front foot. It gets
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Workcation Part 2: March 2017 Session

(If you’re wondering, I didn’t write up Part 1 so you didn’t miss anything.) Brian and I came up with our Workcation Idea while driving back from the Poconos one weekend: What if every 2 months, we booked a weekend someplace without Internet and cranked out a bunch of work? No (or at least, limited) Internet. No distractions. Just work for the weekend. Brian wanted to work on a screenplay. I wanted to work on my online business, ImMovingtoLA.com, and articles and scripts I’m writing for I WIll Teach and GrowthLab.   It seemed like an awesome idea so we
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How a Fortune 100 Company Uses Social Media

Over the last few weeks, my role at I Will Teach has morphed and I’ve been doing a lot more bootstrapped content marketing. In other words, “write more content and find ways to spread it without a budget.” To learn how other people and companies do this, I had a coffee meeting with a social media strategist at a Fortune 100 company. It was really interesting to learn about how “the big boys” do it. 99% of the time I study content or social media marketing, it’s from solopreneurs or small businesses, so it was cool to get insights from
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How to Biz Dev Through Instagram’s Direct Messages with Gary Vaynerchuk – My notes

I love crunchy, tactical how-to articles. We know we SHOULD: Network more Ask for a raise Build our brand Fine… show me “how” to do it. (It’s no wonder I’ve spent 3 years working with Ramit Sethi, who is one of the masters of teaching people the “how.”) So when Gary Vaynerchuk walked through how to do business development on Instagram, I broke down the examples (“the how”) and the principles (“the why”). Then I posted it below. (You can listen to the whole audio here.) Here we go: How to Biz Dev Through Instagram Direct Message Example 1 –
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My Notes from: Gary Vaynerchuk on the State of the Advertising Industry

Damn, Gary Vaynerchuk gets me fired up. Here’s an interview he did about the state of the Advertising Industry. I loved this so much, I asked a VA to transcribe it for me, so I don’t have to relisten for the nuggets. Major theme: Be the one to put yourself out of business. If you don’t someone will do it for you. Business that killed businesses Craigslist killed classifieds Dollar Shave Club should have been done by Gillette Business Insider should have been created by WSJ Sports Illustrated or ESPN should have built Bleacher Report Conde Nast → Refinery29 Marriott
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My notes from Chow: Making the Chinese American Restaurant

Went to the Museum of Food and Drink in Williamsburg last week! It was awesome! The exhibit was called Chow: Making the Chinese American Restaurant. At nearly every panel I felt a visceral connection. Here are some of the pieces that resonated, and why: In my opinion, this sums up the Chinese mentality, pride, and way of life: “They did what no one else would do.”   More fun times.  
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How to Persuade People to Work for Free

In the last ten years, I’ve worked for free many times. “Uh, no shit. It’s called an internship.” Not so fast. I’m not just talking about internships (though of course, I did those too). I’m talking about working for free outside the safety umbrella of a university. Without the structure of an internship program. As a grown-ass man with man bills to pay: I worked on sets for indie movies and music videos. I read scripts. I researched for authors. I watched Youtube videos. I did casting. I consulted on marketing plans. All free work. In rare cases, yeah, it
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The Importance of Pre-Meal

On January 13, 2009, we opened our restaurant, Shogun, in Delmar, NY and my father held our first pre-meal inside the kitchen. As the first of the soft-opening customers trickled through the front door, he shared this nugget of instruction: “This is how you pour miso soup.” We were about to open a Japanese restaurant — and we didn’t know how to serve the soup. This is like asking for garlic bread at The Olive Garden and your server saying, “Garlic what?” Case Studies: The Difference Pre-Meal Makes I always thought pre-meal was the best part of a shift. Our pre-meals
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A Million Moments of Serendipity

Couple weeks ago, I was researching charisma, the ability to build rapport, that sort of thing. It led me down the path of the Charismatic Man: the Bill Clinton’s, the Dale Carnegie’s, the Neil Strauss’s… All of which were extremely interesting. But not the right context for me. A familiar voice creeped into my ear as the deadline for this research approached, a voice rooted deep in the lizard brain, strong and powerful — but one of very limited vocabulary: Why did you take on this project? You’re not smart enough to figure it out.  You’re running out of time.
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I Get Anxiety Over This Type of E-mail

There’s one type of email that I loathe above all others. Can you guess what it is? I bet it’s not what you’re thinking. I hate ’em. Seriously, I’d rather read hate mail. I’d rather read Tea Party literature hand-curated by Ted Cruz, or ad-copy from AT&T explaining how bundling my cable, phone and Internet could save me $300. The interesting part? About 75% of the time, what’s inside these emails… Is glowing. Overwhelming positive. Even raving.  Yet the anxiety still seizes me like talons around testicles the moment I see the number (1) in the sub-category I keep for these emails, like a raised
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Trade Up Problems

Below is the transcription of the best three-minute segment of an interview I’ve heard in a long time. And I listen to a lot of interviews. [01:37:53] It’s not like you read one book and do one thing, and it’s figured out, and you’re done. it’s a constant course correction. You need to have those rituals to go back to. [01:38:29] People don’t get it. It’s messy. Life is messy. [01:38:45] It’s messy. Life is always going to be messy. It’s in figuring out how to manage that mess, and planning, “what am I going to do with this?” [01:39:30] Life is suffering. If you
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What Makes Me Valuable

To others? If I did this task better, how will it affect my career five years from now? How will it make me more valuable five years from now? I think it’s important to step back and ask ourselves that on occasion. If I schedule all these lunches today, will it make more valuable to others? If I send out all these rejection letters? If I mail out all these check letters? If I connect every call that comes through? If I indiscriminately do drinks five nights a week? If I book this travel? If I move widget A into the
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What I’m Reading: 3/30/2014

These are the highlights of what I read, watched, and listened to this past week: For Pleasure Get Shorty by Elmore Leonard (book) 60% of the way through Can You Hack Charisma? by Teresa Chin (article) When she was working on a story for Forbes and felt she had a reason for introducing herself to people, for example, she noticed she would hold an upright stance—more so than when she approached someone at a party. Her personality didn’t change, just her internal sense of comfort, and the way her actions appeared to others. change the exterior first, which will affect the interior. 
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Multiply Strengths vs. Improve Weaknesses

The school of thought goes like this: “Focus on your strengths to see exponential growth. At best, improving your weaknesses leads to marginal growth.” The idea’s touted all over the internet. Here’s one or two places. Check your Google for others. In theory this sounds fine. By sticking to your strengths, you’ll “produce” (in the broadest definition of the word) more for the world, at a higher quality, with greater satisfaction. Versus struggling through tasks which require a disposition you don’t have, or skill sets you haven’t acquired. For example, in all likelihood I will never become a terrific programmer
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What I’m Reading: 3/23/2014

Highlights of my reading, listening, watching this past week: For Pleasure Prayers for Rain by Dennis Lehane The last Lehane book on my list to read. 12 Rules for Learning Foreign Languages in Record Time — The Only Post You’ll Ever Need by Benny Lewis Silicon Valley’s Youth Problem by Yiren Lu In a follow-up interview: “Can you tell me more about the angst you describe in Silicon Valley? Those of us on the outside might think that angst does not belong in the same sentence as, say, $100,000 starting salaries. The angst I’m describing has nothing to do with money in
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First Impressions Stick

It’s human nature, I think, to believe your first impression. The one made the second someone walks through your door, and puts their hand into yours. Humans are predisposed to look for evidence that corroborates what we already believe, not find reasons why we may be wrong. So if you come into your first Hollywood production company as a intern, big-eyed and cash-money green, that’s how people will see you. For a long time. If you come into a studio as an assistant, they may never see you as executive material. Not that it doesn’t happen — of course it
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What I’m Reading: 3/16/2014

These are the highlights of what I read, watched, and listened to this past week: Books Get Shorty by Elmore Leonard I’m only about 50 pages in.I’ve been stymied by recent script reading/work, so haven’t contributed enough time between work tasks and at night as I’d like. It was tough digging into Leonard’s writing at first, but since so many crime novelists attribute him for their style, I’ve stuck it out and think I’m over the hump. Will probably need another two weeks to finish.  Articles The Math of Hit TV Shows by Amy Chozick Why a Failed Pilot Actually
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When It Was Time to Stop Working for My Father

Last week, I talked about how to recognize when it’s time to leave your organization. If they’re telling you: “Don’t try new things.” “Toe the line.” “Do what worked before.” Then it’s time to go. It sounds so simple, doesn’t it? Of course, quitting your job never is. This is the story of quitting my first job after college… working for my father. I worked for my father for about two years, starting in the winter of 2008. It was one of the best learning and life experiences I could ask for. In hindsight, we opened the first restaurant, Shogun
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If You’re Looking for Permission You’ve Come to the Wrong Place

One of my favorite interviews of all time (and thanks to the handcrafted Aux Hook-up in my car, I listen to many) is Bryan Elliot’s interview of Seth Godin, for the Icarus Deception. In the interview, Seth says — and I’m going to paraphrase here: “The excuse that, ‘My boss doesn’t give me permission’ is a bad one. Why should he? You’re not asking for permission, what you’re saying is, ‘Can I go do this thing, and if it works, I’m going to take all the credit, and if it doesn’t, you’ll take all the blame.’ Who would agree to
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This Is What I Accomplished with All The Time in the World

For an extended stretch of time two years ago,  I had A LOT of time to write. It’s called “unemployed.” I had finished a Production Coordinator job. I wasn’t great at being a Production Coordinator — you in fact, need to know things about Production in order to Coordinate — which I did not. Nor did I possess a passion for physical production. So no surprise THERE when I wasn’t asked to join the next project. (The indignation of some interns and temps, when they’re not asked to stay on for full employment, baffles me. If they didn’t try to
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It Took Me 4 Years to Build a Regular Poker Game – And Why That’s Okay

The second time my roommates and I hosted a poker game in Los Angeles, four people showed up to the apartment. Three of them — including myself — lived there. The fourth, he was interning (like us), was car-less, and lived in a hotel in downtown Los Angeles. Armed with a bag of Doritos and pretzel thins, he took a 45-minute bus ride to arrive at our doorstop… to find that everyone else flaked. An hour later and the Doritos eaten, we gave him a ride back to his hotel. How hard was starting a small poker game? How different
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The ONE Thing My Friend Taught Me… That Changed My Career, Relationships, and Happiness

I keep a mental list of things I’m awful at: Cooking Making the bed Writing long lists Only one thing really held me back, in my career, personal life, and relationships, though. In college, when I saw how my friend used this one strategy, it was like a strong punch of sobriety after a night of too many cheap vodka shots. It’s effect in this year alone: I earned more money (almost a $10,000 yearly increase), created my first Hollywood tracking board, and developed a more valuable network of colleagues. I’ll get to all that. First, though – back to
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Where’d Ming Go?

Hey dudes. I’m still very much here – but have been working on projects that pulled me away from posting on this blog. Will start posting again soon. (If you want to see one of the projects that’s absorbed a lot of my time the last few months, click here to read Fighting Broke, my blog on personal finance and career advice for Hollywood assistants.) Talk soon. Photo Credit: Mti Abhi
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Why We Love Distractions

There was a contract on my desk I could not get through. Every time I sat down, fourth (fifth… sixth…) cup of coffee in hand, armed with a pen and true grit, distractions plagued me from every direction. I felt like Macaulay Culkin in the movie MY GIRL, who gets attacked by the Avenging Bee Hive, stung a million times, and dies. Oh. Spoiler alert. I’d get through three sentences, then someone would ping me on instant messenger, asking if we were having a staff meeting. Or an assistant would make a scheduling snafu, and would urgently need to reschedule —
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My Thoughts on Urgency and The Medicine Ball Session

I imagine most cyclists pump Skrillex or Sevendust through their headphones during their rides. Currently, for me it’s a choice between Katy Perry’s new album PRISM or Seth Godin’s Medicine Ball Sessions. I chose the latter today because I can turn on the former when I get to work. The Medicine Ball Sessions clarified this sense of urgency I’ve been having in the pit of my stomach. At one point, I attributed the urgency to my age and societal pressure and the effects of social media. I thought: At this age I should have more affect on the world I
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The Difference in Small Fears vs Big Fears

I’ve been thinking a lot about small failures lately. In my experience, they’re more difficult to publicly face than large failures.   For example, in 2008, when my father opened the first Shogun, the idea that “this might might work” didn’t cross my mind too often. I felt like: “Of course this might not work!” It’s a big risk. The economy is depressed. One out of 4 restaurants fail in their first year. That number rises, to three in 5, over the next 3 years. We faced plenty of other obstacles: Was there a market for Japanese food in Delmar?
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What I’m Reading: Understanding Michael Ovitz

I think understanding context is crucial for education and self-development. An example: my current employer, Intellectual Property Group is a successor to the H.N. Swanson Literary Agency, one of the greatest Hollywood Lit Agencies of all time. Swanie represented some of the greatest literary heavyweights: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Raymond Chandler, James M. Cain, etc. The foreword to his memoir, SPRINKLED WITH RUBY DUST, was written by client, the late great Elmore Leonard. The Importance Of Context In reading Swanie’s memoir and understanding the circumstances in which he built his agency, I understand the nature of my work and my environment
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How Do You Decide: Take a New Job or Stay at Your Old Job?

I got offered the opportunity to work for a show runner the other day. Was it the right decision? My friend asked me to call him. He said, “This position is about to open up. I can tee it up for you, but you have to tell me ‘yes’ or ‘no’ in four hours. You’re the first person I’m going to, but if you pass I need to get someone else in the room.” It’s a gun-to-the-head situation, but fair play. I thought it over, as I tried focusing on check letters and connecting calls and the minutia of the
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What I’m Reading: 10/1/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: Better Chemistry Through Research: How Writers Make “Breaking Bad” So Uncomfortably Real Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy Filmmaker Lynn Shelton: ‘There’s This Real Deliciousness To Being Able To Do Exactly What You Want To Do’ Lynn Shelton is proof that you don’t have to appear on some variation of a “30 Under 30” list to be successful. “It was a long, circuitous route for me,” says the Seattle-based filmmaker. 10 revenue streams funding investigative journalism | Media news | Journalism.co.uk The Art of Speed:
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Finished Shooting A Web Series and It’s Effect on Everything or Nothing

We finished our web series. Three episodes, six producers/directors, 11 actors. It was a fantastic two days: Here’s a List of Barriers I personally had to overcome to Get To Done: My distaste for preproduction My dislike for physical production (and physical labor, for that matter) Heated 90-minute arguments over whether to shoot 3 episodes or 1 episode My hang-up over my own failed passion project Even after smacking around these barriers like they owed me money and reaching a success milestone… doubts linger. It probably stems from my immersion in self-dev (turns out you actually have to apply this
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What I’m Reading: 9/5/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: I’ve made an effort to read deeper, instead of just hopping around my Feedly account like a one-footed jackrabbit. It takes a lot longer, and you can’t just skim the headlines, but deep reading provides clarity to complex situations, beyond the ability to regurgitate the facts. For example, on the general topic of “Is Silicon Really Changing the World?” I read, in this order: Why Draper University Won’t Work (But Could) | Study Hacks Startup Culture’s Lack Of Diversity Stifles Innovation | Fast Company |
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The Benefits of “No”

I read this beautiful piece by Kevin Ashton called Creative People Say No. The gist of which can be summed below: Saying “no” has more creative power than ideas, insights and talent combined. No guards time, the thread from which we weave our creations. The math of time is simple: you have less than you think and need more than you know. We are not taught to say “no.” We are taught not to say “no.” “No” is rude. “No” is a rebuff, a rebuttal, a minor act of verbal violence. “No” is for drugs and strangers with candy. Creators
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What I’m Reading: 8/28/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: Day Trading Is a Sucker’s Game Crossing Wall Street | Crossing Wall Street“The good news is that this means that our formula for investing is now at an even greater premium. The ingredients of that formula are the same as ever: (1) Find good-quality companies; (2) Buy said companies’ stock at good prices; (3) Be patient. You don’t need to be the fastest trader, or have the most gizmos working for you. You don’t have to make the perfect trade every time. What you do have
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What I Learned From My Failed Passion Project

There were dozens of fingerprints on it, but it was my world. I was the Alpha and the Omega, bitch. Unfortunately, the execution was flawed. I populated my world with creatures to roam the land… but forgot to give ‘em lungs to breathe the air. Oops. So when my friend Richard brought up a project called SUBTEXT by the Pander Brothers over lunch, it felt like a gut shot at first. He read the logline: “A young woman is led into a tryst by her boyfriend via phone texts, only to discover a painful truth about their relationship.” That sounds
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What I’m Reading: 8/21/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: An End Of Books | Seth Godin “Yes, we’re entering a new golden age for books, one with more books and ebooks being written and read today than ever before. No, books won’t be completely eliminated, just as vinyl records are still around (a new vinyl store is opening in my little town). But please don’t hold your breath for any element of the treasured ecosystem to return in force.” America Can’t Afford Wall Street’s Terrible Investment Advice | TIME.com “Assume that you are an
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“You Don’t Know As Much As You Think”

Hopping aboard any digital sharing bandwagon was always a struggle: Twitter, Foursquare, Facebook. Before that: LinkedIn, LiveJournal, MySpace, Xanga. So on. So forth. I didn’t gravitate towards voicing my opinion on pop culture and politics Or what I had for breakfast. Didn’t think this literature was worth the digital space of 1’s and 0’s it took up. I made attempts through the years, but never felt strong doing it. It’s easier, I think, to catch this early wave of social sharing that leads to YouTube sensations and pop-culture-websites-to-book deals when your parents convinced you you’re a unique snowflake whose opinion
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What I’m Reading: 8/14/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: ANYTHING YOU WANT by Derek Sivers Weinstein Co. Lands Bill Murray’s Next Film, ‘St. Vincent De Van Nuys’ – Deadline.com | Deadline Love this story about Ted Melfi getting Bill Murray behind his project, which I read after hearing Melfi would also be adapting THE TENDER BAR. Patrick Whitesell on The Future of Content & WME An interview of interest if you work in Hollywood and want a glimpse at the overarching reach of one of the big 4 talent agencies, in the entertainment world
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The Use of Barriers

I wrote about the Use of Feedback to calibrate my work. Today I wanted to write about Barriers. I define a barrier as a tool or technique that prevents distraction. I remember in college, I had friends who complained about being unable to study. They said they couldn’t focus. They became web doctors and self-diagnosed themselves with ADD or dyslexia, not taking into account their study environment. Nothing about their environments were conducive to studying: it was a dorm room where either someone was playing a videogame, or the television was tuned into the latest rerun of NEXT TOP MODEL.
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What I’m Reading: 8/7/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: Understanding Google | stratēchery by Ben Thompson “The surest route to befuddlement in the tech industry is comparing a vertical player, like Apple, with a horizontal one, like Google.” Inside Look at How Netflix Launches an Original Series | TIME.com Simon Sinek Ted Talk: How Great Leaders Inspire Action “There’s the ‘what,’ the ‘how,’ and the ‘why’ we do things — it’s the ‘why’ that matters.” 06:00 “It’s not what we sell, it’s why we sell.” 11:00 “People don’t buy what you do, they buy
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Prioritizing So Hard It Hurts

“I’m prioritizing so hard it hurts.” I first heard BJ Fogg, a Stanford professor who studies and teacher persuasion, utter this expression a year ago. As I listened to his interview (again and again — check it out here) I tried wrapping my mind around that idea. I didn’t get it, until a recent Saturday afternoon (which I’ll get to it below). The circumstances in which prioritization can inflict pain and cause ache suddenly emerged into focus. The Progression of My Understanding First the easy part: awareness  at the macro level, all the things you want to accomplish with your
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What I’m Reading: 7/31/2013

These are highlights of what I read (and watched and listened to) this past week: Wheeler Dixon’s DEATH OF THE MOGULS “Death of the Moguls is a detailed assessment of the last days of the “rulers of film.” Wheeler Winston Dixon examines the careers of such moguls as  Harry Cohn at Columbia, Louis B. Mayer at MGM, Jack L. Warner at Warner Brothers, Adolph Zukor at Paramount, and Herbert J. Yates at Republic in the dying days of their once-mighty empires.” I wanted to build on my fundamentals of Hollywood history, to wrap context around what I’m learning today. If
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The Use of Feedback

I wanted to write about Feedback, Barriers, Stakes, and Batching (though I covered some thoughts on batching in My Morning Routine). I put off exploring these ideas and concepts because: Covering all of them felt extremely daunting Tactically I hadn’t worked out a system to implement them Wasn’t sure if my ideas were completely fleshed out However, the only way I’ll eventually get through all three is by first exploring one. Thus… What is Feedback? Feedback is the process of soliciting criticism for our work, using focused time to filter and distill those criticisms, and meaningfully implementing changes to improve
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What You Listen To Can Change Your Life

Ninety percent of my car rides I spend listening to “self-development,” a convenient grouping for the countless interviews, TED talks, and commencement speeches on my iPod. These last three months, as I steadily increased the number of times I bicycled to work in lieu of trapping myself in a steel cage with wheels, I’ve missed out on hours of their words of encouragement. In their place, I’ve traded for the sounds of morning sprinklers on pathetic strips of grass adjacent to sidewalks and apartment complexes, the rumble of earth movers beneath the stretch of the 10 across from Palms Blvd,
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